More than 100w?

 
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.03.2017  ·  #41
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Co Wicklow
Age: 67
Posts: 2147
Registered: 01 / 2015
My Motorhome: Matilda.
Base Vehicle: Rust 02-Sprinter German engineered from recycled 1960 Fiats
Subject:

Click here and help Support Motorhomecraic.

 · 
Posted: 11.03.2017  ·  #42
Quote by Ally

7.1 amps in March! Mucking Fagic :)

Now you really are rubbing it in >_< 8-) :ninja:
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.03.2017  ·  #43
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Co Antrim
Age: 70
Posts: 6318
Registered: 01 / 2012
My Motorhome: Adria Vision
Base Vehicle: Renault
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.03.2017  ·  #44
I think Ally is possibly reading the speedometer?
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.03.2017  ·  #45
ntg
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Portglenone. Co Antrim
Posts: 1028
Registered: 04 / 2012
My Motorhome:
Base Vehicle:
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.03.2017  ·  #46
Quote by Ally

7.1 amps in March! Mucking Fagic :)


Ally your spell checker must have stopped working ;-)
Looks like you are really well geared up now for the TITTS weekends
No user has liked this post yet.
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Co Wicklow
Age: 67
Posts: 2147
Registered: 01 / 2015
My Motorhome: Matilda.
Base Vehicle: Rust 02-Sprinter German engineered from recycled 1960 Fiats
Subject:

More then 100w

 · 
Posted: 11.03.2017  ·  #47
Quote by jacktherev

I think Ally is possibly reading the speedometer?


Or maybe the fuel consumption :'(
No user has liked this post yet.
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Moira, Craigavon
Age: 54
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 8558
Registered: 04 / 2012
My Motorhome:
Base Vehicle:
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 31.03.2017  ·  #48
With all the sunny weather we have had over the past couple of weeks did you check to see what sort of output you were getting.
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 31.03.2017  ·  #49
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: comber
Age: 56
Posts: 179
Registered: 05 / 2012
My Motorhome: Bailey 740
Base Vehicle:
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 03.04.2017  ·  #50
Quote by the fat controller

With all the sunny weather we have had over the past couple of weeks did you check to see what sort of output you were getting.


I was getting 8.8 yesterday from my 2x 100w :D
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 03.04.2017  ·  #51
JJF
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender: n/a
Location: Donegal
Age: 51
Posts: 1999
Registered: 10 / 2014
My Motorhome:
Base Vehicle:
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 03.04.2017  ·  #52
Managed 5.6 yesterday from single 160w panel, not bad for an average day although the sun was warm when it appeared.
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 15.04.2017  ·  #53
Newbie
Avatar
Gender: n/a
Age: 44
Posts: 6
Registered: 02 / 2017
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 19.04.2017  ·  #54
What sort of amps are you getting in cloudy weather ?
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 19.04.2017  ·  #55
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 07.02.2018  ·  #56
Quote by kabundi

Why don't you go for a system where the two solar panels are in series rather than parallel.

In this case you get much better output from the system as the voltage from the panels in series is double that when in the Pamela are in parallel. This means that in poorer light conditions you have an input voltage high enough to provide an output current to charge your batteries.

You will need a MPPT controller that will accept a larger voltage range on the input and still give 12volt output.


I keep thinking about your post.

I have 2x100 watt panels and a 300 watt mppt regulator, can I run them in series?

I looked a bit into this at the time but it's way over my electrical knowledge!
No user has liked this post yet.
Love's the Craic
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Galway
Age: 45
Posts: 272
Registered: 07 / 2017
My Motorhome:
Base Vehicle: Vauxhall Movano 2.5 CDTI
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 07.02.2018  ·  #57
Here's my two cents. You have 2 x 100W panels. They are wired in parallel. You are seeing increased charging current. Everything is working fine and you are getting the benefit of the extra panel.

Your panels will most likely have an open circuit voltage rating of about 18 Volts (VOC). This is suitable to charge a 12 V battery or battery bank as your charge controller will need to see volts in excess of the battery terminal voltage to charge.

When wired in parallel, the voltage remains the same but the current from each panel is additive e.g. both panels are producing 15 volts at 5 amps. The charger sees 15 volts at 10 amps. I say 15 as the VOC value is an open circuit nominal value. Realistically, this figure will not be achieved once the circuit is made.

You could wire them in series. When wired in series, the voltage is additive but the current remains the same, e.g. both panels are producing 15 volts at 5 amps. The charger sees 30 volts at 5 amps.

15V x 10A = 30V x 5A = 150 Watts. You will not get any extra magic by suddenly wiring in series. You would also need to know that your charge controller can handle the higher input voltage when wired in series. Which it probably can.

So why would anyone need to wire in series? Well if you needed to charge a 24 Volt battery, that would be a good reason, as the charge controller would need to see the higher voltage.

It’s a bit like driving two loudspeakers for mono operation. Say they are both 50 Watts. They could be wired in series or parallel. Providing your amplifier can handle the lower impedance when wired in parallel, then the total power produced is 100Watt. If wired in series, the voltage received by each speaker is halved but the total current is doubled. They still produce 100 Watts collectively. Choosing one over the other is more to do with interfacing.
No user has liked this post yet.
Love's the Craic
Avatar
Gender: n/a
Location: West Cork
Age: 46
Posts: 160
Registered: 12 / 2013
My Motorhome: 2015 Adria 640 SHX
Base Vehicle: Ducato X250 2.3
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 07.02.2018  ·  #58
What solar controller are you using? From my research the Trimetric solar controllers are the best at getting the most from your batteries as long as you have everything else setup correctly like wire diameters etc.
http://www.bogartengineering.com/products/trimetrics.html
I have an Alden one that came with the van but I'd like to fit another 100w panel and a Trimetric TM2030 and SC2030 and a pair of decent batteries.
Hard to budget for at the moment but I am sure that they would pay for themselves in a short time, the biggest killer of batteries is chronic undercharging which is all too common.
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 07.02.2018  ·  #59
Quote by Bounder

What solar controller are you using? the biggest killer of batteries is chronic undercharging which is all too common.


This one: http://www.motorhomecraic.com/…#real97432


Quote by Bounder

the biggest killer of batteries is chronic undercharging which is all too common.


That makes a lot of sense to me and seems to hold true from what I have experienced. I think most folk don't realise the energy involved in getting them back to 100% charge. I certainly don't!
No user has liked this post yet.
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Craigavon
Age: 70
Posts: 345
Registered: 06 / 2012
My Motorhome: Rapido 7065FF
Base Vehicle: Fiat Ducato X250 2.3L 130bhp
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.02.2018  ·  #60
Quote by The Rambler

Here's my two cents. You have 2 x 100W panels. They are wired in parallel. You are seeing increased charging current. Everything is working fine and you are getting the benefit of the extra panel.

Your panels will most likely have an open circuit voltage rating of about 18 Volts (VOC). This is suitable to charge a 12 V battery or battery bank as your charge controller will need to see volts in excess of the battery terminal voltage to charge.

When wired in parallel, the voltage remains the same but the current from each panel is additive e.g. both panels are producing 15 volts at 5 amps. The charger sees 15 volts at 10 amps. I say 15 as the VOC value is an open circuit nominal value. Realistically, this figure will not be achieved once the circuit is made.

You could wire them in series. When wired in series, the voltage is additive but the current remains the same, e.g. both panels are producing 15 volts at 5 amps. The charger sees 30 volts at 5 amps.

15V x 10A = 30V x 5A = 150 Watts. You will not get any extra magic by suddenly wiring in series. You would also need to know that your charge controller can handle the higher input voltage when wired in series. Which it probably can.

So why would anyone need to wire in series? Well if you needed to charge a 24 Volt battery, that would be a good reason, as the charge controller would need to see the higher voltage.

It’s a bit like driving two loudspeakers for mono operation. Say they are both 50 Watts. They could be wired in series or parallel. Providing your amplifier can handle the lower impedance when wired in parallel, then the total power produced is 100Watt. If wired in series, the voltage received by each speaker is halved but the total current is doubled. They still produce 100 Watts collectively. Choosing one over the other is more to do with interfacing.


You are correct in what you say.

However you are only considering the situation in good sunlight conditions. As the sunlight decreases the output voltage from the solar panel also falls.

In the parallel situation, when the solar panel voltage falls to below 14volts you will effectively not have sufficient output from the solar controller to charge the batteries.

In the series situation where the input voltage to the controller is double the individual solar panel voltage you will be able to charge the batteries as long as the individual solar panel is providing more than 7 volts (14 volts in total)

The benefit of series connection only applies in poor light conditions (winter time and early/late in the day at other times of the year). This is also usually the time when battery demand is at its highest.

In good light where the solar panel output is 14volts or more there will be no difference in performance between series and parallel connection.
One user likes this post:
big LIam
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Craigavon
Age: 70
Posts: 345
Registered: 06 / 2012
My Motorhome: Rapido 7065FF
Base Vehicle: Fiat Ducato X250 2.3L 130bhp
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.02.2018  ·  #61
Quote by Ally

Quote by kabundi

Why don't you go for a system where the two solar panels are in series rather than parallel.

In this case you get much better output from the system as the voltage from the panels in series is double that when in the Pamela are in parallel. This means that in poorer light conditions you have an input voltage high enough to provide an output current to charge your batteries.

You will need a MPPT controller that will accept a larger voltage range on the input and still give 12volt output.


I keep thinking about your post.

I have 2x100 watt panels and a 300 watt mppt regulator, can I run them in series?

I looked a bit into this at the time but it's way over my electrical knowledge!


Depends on your mppt controller. What is the maximum input voltage it will accept?
No user has liked this post yet.
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Craigavon
Age: 70
Posts: 345
Registered: 06 / 2012
My Motorhome: Rapido 7065FF
Base Vehicle: Fiat Ducato X250 2.3L 130bhp
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.02.2018  ·  #62
Quote by Ally

Finally ready to buy another 100 watt panel.

Going to go for the MPPT controller quoted above (I see it has went up in price), I don;t really need the engine battery charged as i use the van weekly.

MPPT controlled says it can support up to 300watt, so I'd be safe to buy a 150watt panel, bringing me to 250watt's?

This One


Just checked the spec on the PCM3012.

The maximum input voltage is specified as Voc 50volts. This is OK for two 12 volt solar panels in series. The max Voc of each of your panels will be 21 or 22 volts

The MPPT control range has a max of 37volts, this is the max voltage in operation that the controller can accept. This is right at the top end of what MIGHT get produced from your two panels in series when they are under load.

The controller should be just OK but don't have your solar panels connected to the controller without the batteries connected.
No user has liked this post yet.
Love's the Craic
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Wicklow Town
Age: 52
Posts: 183
Registered: 08 / 2014
My Motorhome: ADRIA 580dx
Base Vehicle: 1999 Ducato 2.8 idtd
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.02.2018  ·  #63
Quote by kabundi

Quote by Ally

Finally ready to buy another 100 watt panel.

Going to go for the MPPT controller quoted above (I see it has went up in price), I don;t really need the engine battery charged as i use the van weekly.

MPPT controlled says it can support up to 300watt, so I'd be safe to buy a 150watt panel, bringing me to 250watt's?

This One


Just checked the spec on the PCM3012.

The maximum input voltage is specified as Voc 50volts. This is OK for two 12 volt solar panels in series. The max Voc of each of your panels will be 21 or 22 volts

The MPPT control range has a max of 37volts, this is the max voltage in operation that the controller can accept. This is right at the top end of what MIGHT get produced from your two panels in series when they are under load.

The controller should be just OK but don't have your solar panels connected to the controller without the batteries connected.


That is the exact MPPT controller I have in my van. I wired 2 x 100 watt mono crystalline panels in series and have had excellent results all year round with this configuration.
No user has liked this post yet.
Love's the Craic
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Galway
Age: 45
Posts: 272
Registered: 07 / 2017
My Motorhome:
Base Vehicle: Vauxhall Movano 2.5 CDTI
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.02.2018  ·  #64
Quote by kabundi

However you are only considering the situation in good sunlight conditions. As the sunlight decreases the output voltage from the solar panel also falls.

In the parallel situation, when the solar panel voltage falls to below 14volts you will effectively not have sufficient output from the solar controller to charge the batteries.

In the series situation where the input voltage to the controller is double the individual solar panel voltage you will be able to charge the batteries as long as the individual solar panel is providing more than 7 volts (14 volts in total)

The benefit of series connection only applies in poor light conditions (winter time and early/late in the day at other times of the year). This is also usually the time when battery demand is at its highest.

In good light where the solar panel output is 14volts or more there will be no difference in performance between series and parallel connection.


But isn't the problem then a lack of charging current? The way I see is that the PV panel voltage remains fairly constant over a wide range of light intensity. But the panel current is more or less proportional. By the time the voltage of your panel drops below the battery terminal voltage, the current available is miniscule i.e. a couple of milliamps. At that point adding another panel in series to just keep the charging going means you have just a miniscule x 2 charging current available.

No user has liked this post yet.
Love's the Craic
Avatar
Gender: n/a
Location: Dublin
Age: 40
Posts: 139
Registered: 12 / 2016
My Motorhome: Rimor Superbrig
Base Vehicle: Ford Transit
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 11.02.2018  ·  #65
Quote by The Rambler

Quote by kabundi

However you are only considering the situation in good sunlight conditions. As the sunlight decreases the output voltage from the solar panel also falls.

In the parallel situation, when the solar panel voltage falls to below 14volts you will effectively not have sufficient output from the solar controller to charge the batteries.

In the series situation where the input voltage to the controller is double the individual solar panel voltage you will be able to charge the batteries as long as the individual solar panel is providing more than 7 volts (14 volts in total)

The benefit of series connection only applies in poor light conditions (winter time and early/late in the day at other times of the year). This is also usually the time when battery demand is at its highest.

In good light where the solar panel output is 14volts or more there will be no difference in performance between series and parallel connection.


But isn't the problem then a lack of charging current? The way I see is that the PV panel voltage remains fairly constant over a wide range of light intensity. But the panel current is more or less proportional. By the time the voltage of your panel drops below the battery terminal voltage, the current available is miniscule i.e. a couple of milliamps. At that point adding another panel in series to just keep the charging going means you have just a miniscule x 2 charging current available.




Agreed on the above. With switch mode power converters, you can regulate a DC output voltage at a fixed setpoint regardless of whether the input voltage is higher or lower than the setpoint or even fluctuating between the two like you'd occasionally expect with solar.

What you can't do is have an output power that is higher than the input power. Power in a DC system is voltage X current. In essence, a low input voltage is fine and dandy as long as there's enough current available and conversely a high input voltage is useless without the current to back it up.

The big difference between a series or parallel array of solar panels is that parallel arrangements are really only optimal when you have two or more panels with comparable performance, when one panel of a parallel array has a lower output than other panel(s), all of the panels will perform at the level of the weakest. This may also come into play where one panel is shaded and others not in a parallel system.

The other thing to consider is your wiring setup, the higher the current, the bigger the crosssection wire you need to avoid melting, while the higher the voltage the bigger the insulation needs to be to avoid shorting. The insulation on the wires and connectors should be adequate to prevent shorting unless you're putting a huge amount in series but a cheap controller could be at risk of shorting but it's also going to be at risk of melting... putting it simply don't buy a cheap controller.
No user has liked this post yet.
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Maynooth
Posts: 150
Registered: 04 / 2016
My Motorhome: Hymer
Base Vehicle: Ducato
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 12.02.2018  ·  #66
Two situations where series may be beneficial
1. In low light situations as explained. If panels in parallel are producing less than the voltage than about the 14V, you get zero charging current.
However, If the voltage is for example 13.5 V in reduced light, wired In series the supplied voltage to the controller, will be approx 27V. The current will be low, but let's say it is 1 Amp for simplicity. The input power to the MPPT controller is 27 Watts (27V X 1A =27W)
A good MPPT controller converts the received power and delivers it out at approx 14V (or whatever the set V is) to the batteries. So you get a charging current of almost 2 Amps (ignoring losses for simplicity!) 27W /14V = 1.93A
In bright sunlight there is no major advantage, although panel temperature may become relevant, but that's a different story.

2. Having two different panels wired in series (e.g. a 100W and a 60W) wired in series should give a net gain in charging current but is unlikely to do so in parallel.

MPPT controller input voltage specification is obviously important, as explained. Worth checking the panel output voltage specs and add together and the MPPT maximum input spec.
PWM controller offers no real advantage for series connection because it simply chops off the voltage above the required charging V and does not deliver a power conversion from input to output.
No user has liked this post yet.
Love's the Craic
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Galway
Age: 45
Posts: 272
Registered: 07 / 2017
My Motorhome:
Base Vehicle: Vauxhall Movano 2.5 CDTI
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 12.02.2018  ·  #67
JoeO, I would have to respectfully disagree with the low light thing. If you could get 2A from two panels wired in series, where 1 would have cutout due to low light, then it would certainly be worth it. But you would be lucky to get 2mA.

I have tested a spare panel in my workplace recently. Voc rated for 37.7V. Outdoors Voc was in excess of 30V and it could give 2-3 Amps. Well below what it is rated for but it was winter. Indoors I measured Voc of about 17V. Enough to keep a battery charging right? Putting an ammeter across the terminals it could only give about 2mA. It doesn't matter what kind of charger you use, you will not get anything more than 34mW from this panel in this scenario.

As an experiment, see what charging current your controller is outputting just prior to cutting out at dusk. If it is in the order of milliamps then it really doesn't matter too much how many panels you have in series.

Similar discussion in this thread: http://forum.solar-electric.co…12v-system

Also a good reason why series wiring could be bad: http://www.ybw.com/forums/archive/index.php/t-346312.html
No user has liked this post yet.
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Maynooth
Posts: 150
Registered: 04 / 2016
My Motorhome: Hymer
Base Vehicle: Ducato
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 13.02.2018  ·  #68
Rambler,
Point taken regarding the pointlessness of trying to get power in very poor light conditions.

The point that I attempted to make, perhaps not very clearly, was to develop Kabundi's good explanation of the possible benefit of connecting panels in series.
The quantum of voltage or current used in the calculation is not important. The effect is the same regardless of whether we have 10A, 1A or 0.1A. The light intensity and the efficiency of the panels, quality of the cables, connections, controller etc. ultimately determine the V, I and R values.
The point is to demonstrate that a series connection can be useful, that and MPPT controller has certain advantages in some circumstances and not to argue that a series connection will generate power better than a parallel set-up in very poor light conditions. Neither set-up is going to provide a substantial power output, in winter at our latitude.
Kubundi did however, offer a good example of the possible circumstances, i.e. getting a charge for longer in the morning and evening of a summer day. I believe this is a correct analysis and worthy of consideration and testing.

There is one other advantage of a series connection which I neglected to mention. That applies to the losses caused by resistance inherent in cables and connections. The power loss is proportional to the square of the current.
P (loss) = R x I2
Resistance R remains constant so, the higher the current the greater the loss. This means that a higher voltage and smaller current (series connection) suffers from less losses than a parallel system of lower voltage and higher current.

Again, point well made and accepted that we can't get much, if any, power from a solar panel in low light, regardless of the series/parallel arrangement.
Joe
No user has liked this post yet.
Love's the Craic
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Galway
Age: 45
Posts: 272
Registered: 07 / 2017
My Motorhome:
Base Vehicle: Vauxhall Movano 2.5 CDTI
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 14.02.2018  ·  #69
Joe, you make some good points and I enjoy the discussion. Anything that might improve performance is certainly worthy of investigation and consideration. In Ally's situation he could certainly chose to wire in series or parallel. My own opinion in his case is that there is no real gain one way or the other but Ally may want to try out for himself.

It should be pointed out of coarse that there are situations where it really does matter when putting panels in series or parallel, lest people think it is just down to personal preference. Such as when seeking to interface voltages correctly, physical constraints on cabling etc. And indeed I2R losses as you mention. Large array solar installation could have branches of hundreds of panels in series generating many kV needed for transmission networks.
No user has liked this post yet.
Administrator
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Muckamore, County Antrim
Age: 49
Homepage: motorhomecraic.com
Posts: 23533
Registered: 08 / 2011
My Motorhome: Gulfstream Sunsport
Base Vehicle: Chevrolet 6.2 V8
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 14.02.2018  ·  #70
Starline S680
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Portadown
Age: 54
Posts: 189
Registered: 09 / 2017
My Motorhome: Hymer S680
Base Vehicle: Mercedes
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 21.02.2018  ·  #71
Is the 25A 300W MPPT solar charge controller regulator 12V LCD PCM 3012 still the current preferred controller.
No user has liked this post yet.
Craic Lifer
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Maynooth
Posts: 150
Registered: 04 / 2016
My Motorhome: Hymer
Base Vehicle: Ducato
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 22.02.2018  ·  #72
I think it may depend on your van, i.e. whether or not it uses an Schaut Elektroblock for power management and which model is used.

If your van does have a Schaut Elektroblock, a number, of regulators are recommended for certain models.
The following Elektroblock units should not use anything other than a Schaudt LRM 1218/LR 1218 or certain Votronic Regulators :
EBL 30, EBL 101, EBL 220, EBL 225, EBL 226, EBL 264.

The Voltronic regulators are
Voltronic MPPT 250. This has an AES driver to trigger an AES Fridge if excess Solar Power is available to run a Fridge on 12v.
The Votronic manual states :
1. Control output EBL, prepared for “Elektroblock” with solar current display, cable set, Art. 2007, required
2. Terminal "AES" with LED display : Automatic commutation of Dometic/ELECTROLUX refrigerators from gas operation to 12 V-operation in case of sufficient solar power by means of “AES” (Automatic Energy Selector)

The other is the
Votronic MPPT Duo 165W dual battery regulator

The LRM 1218 and the LR1218 are dual controllers and are easy to fit because they come with the correct cables and plugs for the Elektroblock.
If your Elektroblock is not one on the list, I guess there is no reason not to use any other controller but you will need to consider how you connect to the Elektroblock, which pin for the inputs etc. There are circuit diagrams available for some Elektroblocks.

I bought a PCM 3012 and a schaut LM 1218 to try both ages ago, but never used the PCM because the schaut was so easy to fit and it is small enough to fit into the front box with the Elektroblock. The block handles everything re dual charging, fusing etc.
Can't comment on which is more efficient for charging.
No user has liked this post yet.
Starline S680
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Portadown
Age: 54
Posts: 189
Registered: 09 / 2017
My Motorhome: Hymer S680
Base Vehicle: Mercedes
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 23.02.2018  ·  #73
The van has 2 x Alden sps 180w ( non mppt fitted in 2013 )controllers each fed by a 100w solar panel. It also has battery master system fitted keeping it stand alone from the Schaut Elektroblock which I prefer and complicates the charging system.
Ive never thought about a point where the 3 x 90 amp banner running bulls would be fully charged and 12v power running the fridge though I can see it may be of use on the odd occasion.
Ive also picked up one of these second hand of ebay before xmas and it was only a few months old, Friday night beer purchase :D

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sola…3.l4275.c1

I need to check the voltage rating of this panel compared to the two 100w panels on the roof to see what way to wire the panels up. If all the same Ill wire them all into the MPPT 300w controller which can take a lot more than rating from reviews and tests ive read.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/MPP…2749.l2649

If the suitcase one is different voltage than the others Ill use the 300w MPPT controller for the main panels and the Adlen sps 180 for the Solar pod 120w panel. The 120w panel is a lot heavier than i thought so my thoughts at the moment is to also mount it on the roof and have it in use all the time rather than used the odd time portable pointing at the winter sun etc.
Just trying to figure out how to max the charging and efficiency. So open to thoughts and input :)
No user has liked this post yet.
Starline S680
Avatar
Gender:
Location: Portadown
Age: 54
Posts: 189
Registered: 09 / 2017
My Motorhome: Hymer S680
Base Vehicle: Mercedes
Subject:

Re: More than 100w?

 · 
Posted: 07.03.2018  ·  #74
Got round to installing ours this morning will be interesting to see how she compares when out and about. I do like the idea of the controller scree to see whats happening.

No user has liked this post yet.
Selected quotes for multi-quoting:   0

Registered users in this topic

Currently no registered users in this section

The statistic shows who was online during the last 5 minutes. Updated every 90 seconds.